Categories
Discussion topic Incident management Productivity Secrets of the IT department

Secrets of the IT department – Part 1

Like them or loathe them, all employees will need, at some point, to interact with the support services offered by the IT department. In this series of short articles, we uncover some of the secret workings of the IT department, finding out what is jargon and what is just common sense that can apply to all of us, regardless of our role, work, or profession.

Crisis, what crisis? The art of managing incidents

Incident management isn’t just industry jargon; it’s an essential process that aids organisations of all sizes swiftly and efficiently resolving unexpected issues. Picture it as the hospital A&E department for any problems that crop up, from glitches in a computer network to a broken kettle in the staff room.

What is an incident?

Simply put, an incident is an unexpected interruption or a decline in the quality of a service or process. Incidents can vary from minor inconveniences to major disruptions, impacting anything from your home Wi-Fi to a multinational firm’s data centre.

Why incident management matters

Employing a structured approach to incident management ensures that any issues are rectified in the fastest, least intrusive way possible. This not only pleases customers or employees but also preserves the organisation’s reputation while conserving time and resources.

The incident management life cycle

The life cycle of incident management typically consists of four stages:

  1. Identification – spotting the issue
  2. Classification and prioritisation – assessing its impact and urgency
  3. Investigation and diagnosis – finding out what’s wrong
  4. Response and recovery – fixing the problem and restoring normal service.

Example: The broken kettle

Picture arriving at your workplace only to discover the kettle isn’t working. In incident management, this is categorised as a low-priority incident, and someone gets tasked to sort it out.

Example: The inaccessible company website

Next, imagine if your company’s website crashes. This is a high-priority incident as without it, your company’s customers cannot buy new insurance policies or administer existing ones. A team would be hastily assembled to diagnose and remedy the problem, minimising the outage duration.

The benefits of doing this well

Implementing a top-notch incident management strategy yields many advantages:

  • Rapid recovery – effective incident management ensures that disruptions are contained quickly, limiting any negative impact on business operations.
  • Customer retention – swift resolution of issues enhances customer experience and contributes to customer loyalty.
  • Streamlined communication – a well-defined incident management process improves internal and external communication, providing timely stakeholder updates.
  • Regulatory compliance – many industries have standards for incident response times; efficient incident management helps you meet these regulations and avoid penalties.
  • Data-driven improvements – analysing past incidents can offer actionable insights that drive ongoing improvements in the IT environment and broader organisational strategy.

With excellent incident management, organisations can maintain high service quality, even when things go awry, building trust and long-term success.

Your thoughts?

Now that you’re acquainted with the fundamentals of incident management, we’re eager to hear your views. Have you ever had to manage an incident in your workplace? What approach did you take?

Does this small secret from your IT department make what they do make more sense? Does it explain why you have a good or bad impression of your IT department when you contact them for support? What do they do well? What infuriates you?

Categories
Digital Transformation Future tech Productivity

Why we need to stop saying we’re working from home

A thought-provoking article by Chris Pope, one of the leading innovators at ServiceNow, challenges us to rethink our professional lives.

In these remarkable times the article raises important questions about the future of work:

  • What is the future role of humans in a workplace where machine learning and AI is becoming more and more influential? 
  • Why have people happily accepted the status quo for ways of working for so long?
  • Which businesses will thrive? 
  • Which will not survive? 

A few years ago, the thought of drones delivering medicine was the stuff of science fiction – now it’s actively discussed by government ministers.

Covid-19 has changed the world of work forever. 

Chris Pope, VP Innovation at ServiceNow

This change should be celebrated. 

Cloud-based services enable us to work in a very different but better way. Even in the companies that are ahead of the curve on this, there is huge untapped potential.

But to realise these opportunities, we need to change how we refer to work. 

Like so many of us, Chris uses the phrase ‘working from home’. 

To me, the key word is ‘work’. 

Where work is done is of no relevance. 

Matt James, GWIT.ltd

During lockdown we’ve seen a revolution, with technology enabling people to achieve amazing things without leaving their homes. 

The sad thing is that it’s taken a global pandemic to achieve this. 

Let’s stop using the phrase ‘working from home’ and focus on the quality of what we do. 

Matt James, GWIT.ltd

Let’s build on the rapid innovation of recent weeks and accept that the future is not what went before. 

Cutting through bureaucracy to help you automate what matters and stop doing what doesn’t can transform the way we work.

One of GWIT’s clients

At GWIT we transform manual ways of working into digital workflows that are loved by employees and customers alike.

Let us help you thrive during these crazy times. Message Matt if you’d like to chat more. Book a call with Matt.

Let’s start the conversation.

Matt


Here’s the original article from Chris Pope, VP Innovation at ServiceNow: